Father’s Day 2021

A few suggestions; fiction, non-fiction, historical, hysterical; all ages; all pockets. Enjoy.


The 158th edition of the most famous sports book in the world – published every year since 1864 – contains some of the world’s finest sports writing, and reflects on an unprecedented year dominated by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Writers include Lawrence Booth, Sir Garfield Sobers, Ebony Rainford-Brent, Gideon Haigh, Andy Zaltzman, Tom Holland, Duncan Hamilton, Robert Winder, Matthew Engel, Scyld Berry, Derek Pringle, Jack Leach and James Anderson. As usual, Wisden includes the eagerly awaited Notes by the Editor, the Cricketers of the Year awards, and the famous obituaries.

And, as ever, there are reports and scorecards for every Test, together with forthright opinion, compelling features and comprehensive records.

Why, like, does everyone keep saying ‘like’? Why do apostrophe’s keep turning up in the wrong place?
Why do we get confused when using foreign phrases – and vice versa?
Is it ‘may be’ or ‘maybe’? Should it be ‘past’ or ‘passed’? Is it ‘referenda’ or ‘referendums’? FFS, what’s happening to our language!?
Our language is changing, literacy levels are dwindling and our grasp of grammar is at crisis point, so you wouldn’t be alone in thinking WTF! But do not despair, here is the definitive (and hilarious) guide to punctuation, spelling, and good English for the twenty-first century.
Without hesitation or repetition (and just a touch of deviation) Gyles, the Just A Minute regular and self-confessed grammar guru, skewers the linguistic horrors of our time, tells us where we’ve been going wrong (and why), and reveals his tips and tricks to ensure that, in future, we make fewer (rather than ‘less’) mistakes. End of.
(Is ‘End of’ alright? Is ‘alright’ all right? You’ll find out right here . . . )

Lee Ridley won the hearts and minds of the nation on Britain’s Got Talent. Now the much-loved comedian opens up about what it’s like to be him.

I’m Only In It for the Parking is a wonderful romp through Lee’s extraordinary life, by way of the people who like to pray for him, the comparisons with Stephen Hawking, some perilous falls, some epic fails and more information about Lee’s private life than you probably need.

This is the wickedly funny story of the stand-up who struggles to stand up, but who learns to finds his feet. The Geordie without the accent. The entertainer who really can’t speak at all, but who has something important to say.

Our Boys brings to life the human experiences of the paratroopers who fought in the Falklands War, and examines the long aftermath of that conflict. It is a first in many ways – a history of the Parachute Regiment, a group with an elite and aggressive reputation; a study of close-quarters combat on the Falkland Islands; and an exploration of the many legacies of this short and symbolic war.
Told unflinchingly through the experiences of people who lived through it, Our Boys shows how the Falklands conflict began to change Britain’s relationship with its soldiers, and our attitudes to trauma and war itself. It is also the story of one particular soldier: the author’s uncle, who was killed during the conflict, and whose fate has haunted both the author and his fellow paratroopers ever since.

This book is about belonging: about walking in ancient places, in the footsteps of the ancestors. It’s about reaching back in time, to find ourselves, and our place in the world.
We often think of Britain springing from nowhere with the arrival of the Romans. But in Ancestors, pre-eminent archaeologist, broadcaster, and academic Professor Alice Roberts explores what we can learn about the very earliest Britons – from their burial sites. Although we have little evidence of what life was like in prehistorical times, here their stories are told through the bones and funerary offerings left behind, preserved in the ground for thousands of years.
Told through seven fascinating burial sites, this ground-breaking prehistory of Britain teaches us more about ourselves and our history: how people came and went; how we came to be on this island.

We had our hardships, and there were times that we didn’t have a lot of food and didn’t have a lot of money. But that didn’t stop me having the time of my life.Making It is an inspirational memoir about beating the odds and turning things around even when it all seems hopeless. In this book, Jay shares the details of his life, from his childhood growing up sheltered and innocent on a council estate in Hackney, to his adolescence when he was introduced to violent racism at secondary school, to being brutalized by police as a teen, to finally becoming a beloved star of the hit primetime show The Repair Shop.Jay reflects on strength, weakness and what it means to be a man. He questions the boundaries society places on male vulnerability and how letting himself be nurtured helped him flourish into the person he is today. An expert at giving a second life to cherished items, he speaks about how his role as a restorer mirrors his own life – if something’s broken, you can always find a way to put it back together.

At thirty-four, H.E. Bates was deemed too old for active service in WWII. But as a successful author, was commissioned by the nascent RAP Public Relations unit to publicise the bravery of the fighter pilots. Bates was posted to Oakington and Tangmere air bases where, over drinks with the pilots, he gathered their stories and wrote them as Flying Officer X.
The stories convey the pilots’ personal qualities and the forces that motivated them. They blend the action and suspense of aerial battles, the tragedy of friendships cut off too soon, and life enduring against all odds.
Collected into one volume for the first time, along with five previously unpublished stories from the era, this is a remarkable collection.


Tonight, Evelyn Hardcastle will be killed … Again
It is meant to be a celebration but it ends in tragedy. As fireworks explode overhead, Evelyn Hardcastle, the young and beautiful daughter of the house, is killed.
But Evelyn will not die just once. Until Aiden – one of the guests summoned to Blackheath for the party – can solve her murder, the day will repeat itself, over and over again. Every time ending with the fateful pistol shot.
The only way to break this cycle is to identify the killer. But each time the day begins again, Aiden wakes in the body of a different guest. And someone is determined to prevent him ever escaping Blackheath…

He can escape anything. Except his own past . . .
‘Evan. It’s your mother. I heard you help people . . .’
Evan Smoak used to be known as Orphan X: a figure as elusive as a rumour. Plucked from a foster home and trained as an off-the-books assassin known as Orphan X, Evan Smoak always fought to help those most desperate. The kind of help no one else could provide.
But now, forced into early retirement, he dares not trust the phone call. Nor the caller claiming to be his mother, asking him to protect a complete stranger who just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.
None of it stacks up. Yet it bears the tell-tale signs of the secret world that made him, and from inside it, a deadly new threat to the nation’s security.
But this time the danger is more personal than he could have ever imagined. Because blood runs deep . . .

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s